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Title: Americans’ cultural attitudes to group work: Insights from the proverbs.

 

Vol. 9(3), 2021, pp. 6-31

DOI: https://doi.org/10.46687/QETZ7460

 

Author: Mohammad Tamimy

About the author: Mohammad Tamimy is a doctorate candidate of Teaching English to the Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at the Department of Foreign Languages and Linguistics, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran. He is interested in the studies focusing on culture using innovative methodologies. He has published in a few national and international journals including the journal of Intercultural Communication Research. He has also served as a peer-reviewer to a few international journals.

e-mail: mohammad.tamimy@gmail.com; m.tamimy@shirazu.ac.ir                

ORCID iD: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6024-6940

              

Author: Rahman Sahragard

About the author: Rahman Sahragard is a full professor in Applied Linguistics at the Department of Foreign Languages and Linguistics, Shiraz University, Iran and currently serves as the dean of the Faculty of Letters and Humanities. He obtained his PhD from Leicester University, UK, in 2001. He sits on editorial board of a few Iranian and International journals and has extensively published on different topics including discourse analysis, material development, and language teaching.                 

e-mail: rsahragard@rose.shirazu.ac.ir                                 

ORCID iD: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6615-9466

 

Citation (APA style): Tamimy, M., & Sahragard, R.  (2021). Americans’ cultural attitudes to group work: Insights from the proverbs. Studies in Linguistics, Culture, and FLT, 9(3), 6-31.  https://doi.org/ 10.46687/QETZ7460.

 

Link: http://silc.fhn-shu.com/issues/2021-3/SILC_2021_Vol_9_Issue_3_006-031_26.pdf

 

 

Abstract: The role of culture, especially the American culture, in group work is relatively understudied because it is often presumed to be no different from the colonialist West, or is alternatively stereotyped as individualistic and competitive. Thus, this paper studies English-language proverbs used in America, as culturally rich symbols, at three levels of discourse, conceptual metaphor, and content to discern what attitude American culture, as represented in the proverbs, has to group work, and what world views and psychosocial factors can inform such attitudes. The findings suggest that American culture is marginally cooperation friendly, with a considerable penchant for individualism and competition. This ambivalence was not simply a proverbial phenomenon, rather a cultural reality because it was observed to be the result of the interplay between heterogeneous conceptual metaphors, representing different world views. Psychosocially, many factors were observed to have molded the American culture’s attitude to group work, noticeably, egoism, distrust, altruism, and socially shared cognition. 

Key words: culture, group work, proverbs, cooperative learning, American culture

 

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