METADATA


Title: Post-Brexit Britain and Socioeconomic Distress in Ali Smith’s Autumn

 

Vol. 10(1), 2022, pp. 25-38.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.46687/ZNJA7084

 

Author: Mihaela Culea

About the author: Mihaela Culea is an Assoc. Prof. at the Faculty of Letters, Vasile Alecsandri University of Bacău. With a doctoral degree in English literature and culture, her research interests include Enlightenment English literature, British cultural history, cultural studies, discourse analysis.

e-mail: culea.mihaela@ub.ro;                                                    

ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1517-5028

 

Author: Andreia Irina Suciu

About the author: Andreia Irina Suciu is an Assoc. Prof. at the Faculty of Letters, Vasile Alecsandri University of Bacău. Holding a doctoral degree in English literature, her current research interests include contemporary British fiction and drama, the dystopian novel, postmodernity.                 

e-mail: suciu.irina@ub.ro

ORCID ID:  https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7327-3611

 

Link: http://silc.fhn-shu.com/issues/2022-1/SILC_2022_Vol_10_Issue_1_025-038_14.pdf  

 

Citation (APA style): Culea, M., & Suciu, A. I.  (2022). Post-Brexit Britain and Socioeconomic Distress in Ali Smith’s Autumn. Studies in Linguistics, Culture, and FLT, 10(1), 25-38. https://doi.org/10.46687/ZNJA7084.

 

Abstract: Ali Smith’s novel “Autumn” (2016) is a Brexlit novel that depicts aspects of English society associated with a landmark in British history, the 2016 referendum that decided its exit from the EU. The article focuses on socioeconomic aspects touched upon by Smith, including the social division among communities and the communitarian disunity, financial and economic hardship, bureaucratic insensitiveness, the issue of immigration, as well as the public social submissiveness or protest while facing all of these plights. Even though these may not be the central themes of Smith’s novel, the depiction of the ‘hard times’ of people living during a time of change, uncertainty, division, chaos and mixed feelings emerges as an equally important concern, as the current paper aims to explore.

Key words: Brexit, “Autumn”, social division, bureaucracy, economic hardship, immigration

 

References:

  1. Acheson, J. (2017) (ed.). The Contemporary British Novel Since 2000. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. https://doi.org/10.1515/9781474403740
  2. Addison, P., & Jones, H. (2005) (eds.). A Companion to Contemporary Britain, 1939-2000. Blackwell Publishing Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1111/b.9780631220404.2005.00003.x
  3. Boxall, P. (ed.) (2019). The Cambridge Companion to British Fiction 1980-2018. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108649865
  4. Bradford, R. (2007). The Novel Now Contemporary British Fiction. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
  5. Carnevali, F., & Strange, J.-M. (2014) (eds.). Twentieth-century Britain. 2nd ed. New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315835600
  6. Dorling, D., & Tomlinson, S. (2019). Rule Britannia. Brexit and The End of Empire. London: Biteback Publishing Ltd.
  7. Eaglestone, R. (2018) (ed.). Brexit and Literature: Critical and Cultural Responses. London and New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351203197
  8. Ellison, J. (2005). Britain and Europe. In P. Addison & H. Jones (Eds.), A Companion to Contemporary Britain, 1939–2000 (pp. 517-538). Oxford, OX: Blackwell Publishing Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1002/9780470996195.ch30.
  9. Horton, E. (2014). Contemporary Crisis Fictions Affect and Ethics in the Modern British Novel. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137350206
  10. Oakland, J. (2005). Contemporary Britain. A Survey with Texts. Taylor & Francis e-Library.
  11. Panayi, P. (2014). Immigration, Multiculturalism and Racism. In F. Carnevali & J.-M. Strange (Eds.), Twentieth-century Britain (pp. 247-261). 2nd ed. New York, NY: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315835600-28.
  12. Rau, P. (2018). Autumn after the Referendum. In R. Eaglestone (Ed.), Brexit and Literature: Critical and Cultural Responses (pp. 31-43). London and New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351203197-4
  13. Rollings, N. (2014). Britain and Europe. In F. Carnevali F. & J.-M. Strange (Eds.). Twentieth-century Britain (pp. 339-353). 2nd ed. New York, NY: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315835600-34.
  14. Ryan, B. (2018) (ed.). Fortress Britain? Ethical Approaches to Immigration Policy for Post-Brexit Britain. London and Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
  15. Shaw, K. (2021). Brexlit. British Literature and the European Project. London: Bloomsbury Publishing. https://doi.org/10.5040/9781350090866.
  16. Simkova, E. (2020). The Meeting of the Postmodern and Metamodern in the Characters of Ali Smith’s Autumn. Contemporary Studies in Foreign Philology, 18, 262-271. Retrieved from http://respacoll.uzhnu.edu.ua/article/view/213957. https://doi.org/10.24144/2617-3921.2020.18.262-271
  17. Smith, A. (2005). The Accidental. London: Penguin Books.
  18. Smith, A. (2016). Autumn. London: Hamish Hamilton.
  19. Townsend, S. (2012). The Queen and I. With a Foreword by Jo Brand. London: Penguin Books.
  20. Vermeulen, T., & van den Akker, R. (2010). Notes on metamodernism. Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, 2(1), 5677. https://doi.org/10.3402/jac.v2i0.5677. Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3402/jac.v2i0.5677.
  21. Webster, W. (2005). Immigration and Racism. In P. Addison & H. Jones (Eds.). A Companion to Contemporary Britain, 1939–2000 (pp. 93-109). Oxford, OX: Blackwell Publishing Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1002/9780470996195.ch7.